Back to the Past

Time is a curious dimension. Although we might be still in space, there’s no way for us to be still in time. And while we can explore every direction in space, time has a preferred direction: forward. We are constantly traveling through time, and for us we are going to the boring velocity of 1…

Lunatic Hypotheses or How Quickly Theories Have To Adapt

Last week, in a matter of a few days, two studies came out that brought with them a completely different perspective on our Moon. The first one, published in Nature Geoscience, was about an alternative hypothesis on the formation of our natural satellite. The (now) traditional scenario suggests that an object the size of Mars,…

Some personal thoughts on the LGBT STEMinar 2017

Yesterday we had the honour of being part of the second LGBT STEMinar, and it was a triumph. The speakers were all absolutely delightful and incredibly knowledgeable in their field, jumping in and out of technical explanations with talent and humour. I don’t think I’ve ever laughed so much at a conference before! Twitter was…

Has anyone got a recipe for artificial gravity?

One of the underlying ideas in Einstein’s general relativity is that for an observer, the acceleration due to gravity, or the acceleration due to thrust, are identical. This is a consequence of the equivalence principle. This phenomenon is the way to achieve artificial gravity in space. No special material, no crazy technology, just a simple…

Travelling through the cosmos

Space is big. The Voyager probe, launched in 1977 to explore Jupiter and Saturn, took 36 years to leave the Solar System. It is the furthest human object from us, and it is still in our neighbourhood. Even the radio waves we sent into space have barely reached a few hundred star systems, and they…

One Planet, One Climate, One culture.

One of my biggest pet peeves about sci-fi universe building is the lazy approach in building alien civilisations. We often see the trope showing one world, one climate, and one language. Given the variety that our planet has to offer under any aspect it is a shame that the same variety is lost in science…